Security Vehicle

What are the Armored Vehicle Ratings?

Armored Vehicle Ratings – What do armor ratings mean?

Are you considering utilizing an armored vehicle? Perhaps you are heading to an area of increased risk and want to understand more about armored vehicle UK, or are considering Armored Vehicle Rental.

There are two main primary standards used to rate armor – The NIJ and the EN standard.

The NIJ (the U.S body) is considered the world leader for ballistic testing for armor, they perform a full range of tests and provide details of the results in their armor standards. These show the range of protection offered by the different pieces of armor tested, from low powered hand guns, up to armor piercing rifle rounds. They provide 8 classifications of protection known as threat levels which are Class I, IIA, II, IIIA, III, IV, V & VI.

In other regions, predominantly Europe they are typically rated as levels B1-B7 using the Standard EN1063 scale. Both scales are similar in how they rate protection. Armor is typically tested at ranges from 5 meters to 15 meters, depending upon the class/rating and weapon. The class most likely to be found utilized and available on LATAM armored vehicles for rent is Class NIJ IIIA/ and EN standard B4. This will defeat .44 Magnum rounds, 9mm, 12 gauge shotguns and lesser threats.

Higher rated armor is available though always at a premium and is often dedicated to those at an increased level of risk. Class NIJ III/B5 is capable of defeating 7.62 rounds from a Kalishnikov rifle at 5 meters. The ratings then go up to counter significant caliber threats. At the B6/NIJ IV level and above the armor is designed to stop multiple 7.62 up to 30.06 AP (Armor Piercing) and Penetrator rounds and are also resistant to explosions.

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Security Vehicle

Business Travelers: Worrying About Terrorism May Kill You

The looming shadow of terrorism is pervasive. The recent suicide attack that targeted a music concert in Manchester, UK; the vehicle attack in London, UK, two months prior;  and compounded further by regular images across the media of marauding attacks in cities such as Paris and Berlin. These acts of extreme violence are perpetrated by individuals who embrace death as part of the objective of their actions. The very thought of this is no doubt extremely worrisome, but what are the chances of falling victim to terrorism? The simple answer: very small indeed.  Worrying about terrorism to the neglect of more prevalent threats, however, may actually increase your risk.

Business travelers quite often have irrational or misplaced fears that can lead them to not feel secure, when in fact they are, while conversely some often feel secure when abroad but are actually far from it. A significant number of travelers fear the risk of terrorism and, in doing so, neglect those risks that are statistically far more likely to kill or injure them.

“Security is two different things – it is a feeling and a reality. You can feel secure even if you are not and you can be secure even if you don’t feel it,” says security technologist Bruce Schneier.

Schneier further explains certain biases in risk perception:

Human beings tend to exaggerate spectacular and rare risks and downplay common risks.

  1. The unknown is perceived to be riskier than the familiar.

Why and how do these relate to business travel safety?

  • Bias #1: Human beings tend to exaggerate spectacular, rare risks and downplay common risks.

This has led to many people being overly focused on the risk of terrorism. In turn, business travelers and those responsible for the security of business travelers often neglect those threats that are statistically far more likely to kill or injure, such as road traffic incidents, crime and drowning.

What is most likely to kill you when traveling?

The U.S State Department maintains records of all registered deaths of U.S. citizens abroad. The details identify for the majority what they died of and where. The results may surprise you. See the two charts in the images above for details.

In Figure 2, it is interesting to note the correlation between deaths due to Terorism (Yellow) and that of deaths due to Pedestrian accidents (Orange).

  • Bias #2: The unknown is perceived to be riskier than the familiar.

Regular travelers to certain city or location may likely become complacent, especially if they have not been directly affected by any of the dangers or hazards that may be present. This is also referred to as “Boiling Frog Syndrome” – named from the phenomenon that a frog if put into boiling water will immediately jump out, but if you place the frog in cold water and slowly heat it up will stay in there and eventually boil to death.  Not an overly joyous image, but one that paints the picture accurately.

This complacency prevalent with certain travelers often leads to their safety and security decreasing whilst the chances of them being a victim to crime, or neglecting risks increasing. If our feelings match security reality – we make better trade offs.  To improve our personal security services United States it is important to understand these two key biases.

“If it is in the news don’t worry about it, as by definition news is something that almost never happens,” says Bruce Schneier. The solution, therefore, is to know what the risks are – and obtain “Ground Truth.” This should involve research into your destination. What are the main dangers of the country or cities that you will be visiting?

Crime, natural disasters, health issues and political instability are all important factors to consider. Consider also specific and current issues such as date rape drugs being utilized in a tourist hotspot, or a spate of recent muggings in certain locations. Study the U.S. State Department website, or the equivalent travel advisory guidance of your country of origin.

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Why do ETS only utilize Tier One Operators for VIP Protection?

Why does ETS select only former Special Forces and elite government unit personnel for full-time Executive Protection?

Former Special Forces (SF) operators are a natural fit for global executive protection. Formed from the core SF and Elite units such as SAS, Delta, SBS, SEALs, SRR, MI5, MI6, CIA, certain FBI groups, BOPE, DSGE and GIGN, they share the following characteristics and skillsets:

  • Ability to operate under high stress
  • Ability to operate with minimal support
  • Proven ability to work within close-knit teams with or without a formal hierarchy
  • Proven experience in dangerous environments
  • High-level stress induced training and real world stress proven
  • Low profile and covert operations experience lending itself to blending in
  • Nothing to prove and never looking to validate their role
  • Mutual respect for and regular interaction with other tier-one law enforcement and other agencies within their network of security professionals
  • Experience operating against the high-level terrorism, criminal and espionage targets
special event security
special event security

VIP Protection – Value and Skills

Operators cost millions of dollars to train but their true value comes from years of real-world assignments that shape and sharpen their skills, networks and instincts. Their proven unique experience facilitating secure travel and lifestyle in all environments without fanfare is their understated asset. VIPs chaperoned by world-class tier one operators can safely and efficiently move on foreign turf while remaining under the radar. Low profile, discreet and respectful, the former Special Forces operator is a proven and powerful enabler. A conscientious operator able to read the environment and quietly get the job done is an invaluable part of a VIP’s team.

VIP Security – Protection of Reputation as well as Physical Security

As seen repeatedly in the celebrity and corporate worlds, unprofessional personal security can inflict long-lasting reputational harm, or worse. There are multiple untold horror stories of VIP security gone wrong including personal security operators and drivers getting lost on the way to meetings, driving through high-risk environments, and having their VIPs attacked. There are examples of personal special event security negligently discharging firearms, crashing vehicles, and losing track of their protectee. Even less extreme failures have a serious negative impact on business effectiveness, brand reputation, and the personal image of the senior executive. Far too often those most in need of high-level security make the mistake of saving on cost in favor of ‘large, imposing bodyguards’ yet rarely consider if these persons have the training and ability to react.

Executive Protection – Experience is Key

Some Executive Protection businesses, even the largest ones, normally recruit from a pool of civilians, or minimally trained ex-armed forces willing to ‘train’ and accept low wages to become part of the ‘circuit’. These companies celebrate and laud their training programs, yet you can’t teach the skillsets and real-world experience of tier-one professionals in two weeks. Reaction instincts, and covert operations skills under high levels of risk and stress, simply can’t be developed in a hurry.

This is why ETS only uses Tier One personnel from its personal networks, only selecting personnel from the most elite units. It is only through this system that we can guarantee our clients the very best level of service.

Article Source: –  https://ets-riskmanagement.com/why-do-ets-only-utilize-tier-one-operators-for-vip-protection/

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